On Persistence

AtlasHave you ever felt on the edge?  A razor’s width away from the world crushing you?  Have you ever thought maybe you should let it?  Have you ever wondered what would happened if you stopped holding it up, like enduring Atlas, and let the sky fall?

Of course you have, because you are like me–blessed and burdened by circumstance; you are a parent of the extraordinary.  The weight is unimaginable and the task so tiring; for who can hold up the world and the sky?

Nevertheless, we persist.

What is the alternative?  For the sky to come crashing down?

It does that anyway; it falls  with every crisis, every diagnosis, every meltdown, every school meeting, every stare, every medication failure.  And, that is why it is our job to hold it up.  It is our job to make sense of it all every time the earth shakes and another crisis rips the heavens from the firmament.  It is our job to piece it back together–azure patch dotted by fluffy white, patent-leather black pin studded with shiny bright diamonds.

We must make sense of it for our blessed and burdened, extraordinary pieces of heart walking around outside our chests.  For, if we didn’t there would be no understanding, no up or down, no hope.  We would be crushed by nature.

Who makes sense of it for us–holding the earth and the sky, picking up the pieces, placing the stars back one by one?  Who makes sense of the nonsensical?  Who helps carry crushing burden when we fear it will flatten us?  When we are weary and we wish it to?

I do.  We do.  We shoulder our burdens together because we are the few who can understand the job–the immense burden and blessing.  We link arms and hunch shoulders to disperse the weight as we speak of the crises, and diagnoses, the meltdowns, and meetings, the stares, and medications.  We stoop low and scoop the scattered stars and shattered blue canvas of sky the next time it comes tumbling down and help to paste it back up again–and again, and again.

Nevertheless, we persist.

 

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