On Caregiver PTSD

mother statue

Traffic was at a near standstill.  I was acutely aware of the firetrucks and ambulances piling on the highway for the accident on the opposite side.  My chest filled with a small warm feeling I have come to know as the start of the adrenergic response.  I was safe and I assumed everyone else I loved was as well, yet my mind no longer knows the boundary.  All it takes is the errant whistle of siren on the wind for my body to react, for my mind to shuffle through all the previous emergencies, and all the potential possibilities.  It’s become faster as the years pass and the collection of emergencies compound.

And then, it came.

My phone rang, it was my husband.  The school had called, she was seizing again, they called 911, an ambulance was on the way.  My baby girl, alone, with no way of either my husband or myself to get to her.  The small warm feeling in my chest exploded into an all out inferno and I rerouted to the hospital.  I was nearly blinded by the flashbacks of each and every emergent seizure.

This is the reality of parental caregiver post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

I arrived at the hospital before she did and once she got there I didn’t need them to tell me where she was; the trauma room is an all too familiar nemesis.  Everything else disappeared and my vision tunneled on her.  She was barely breathing but no longer seizing.  All emotion was cast aside and logic ruled as I ran down all her medications, the order of medication administration for similar seizures, her seizure signs, and general medical history.

Quickly she began breathing again on her own and waking from the medication induced stupor.  She survived once again–beautifully resilient.

We survived once again.

As the adrenaline started to fade in rushed the blowback from PTSD.  My brain attacked me. I knew looked like a detached mother–hyperlogical and unaffected by the life threatening situation in which I found my daughter.  I’m well acquainted with the sanctimonious online mommies who judge the videos of tragedy and remark how they could never be that composed.  Yet, tragedy and lifethreatening are our regular.

Was I detached?

This is the reality of PTSD.  It warps the brain.  Over the next 48 hours I examined every possible thing I did or didn’t do in my recent and not so recent history that “caused” the latest life threatening event.  My brain tried to create control from a situation over which there was and never will be any.

I wasn’t detached I was dissociated–separated from the emotion–until it was safe to feel them once again.  I didn’t cry until 72 hours out–until I was really sure she survived and I could face the reality of the terror once again.  It was then it came in heaving, racking sobs that I stifled in my pillow as to not wake the house.

And today?  Today I got up and washed my damned face.  I drove her two hours to her neurologist as I was pulsed with a tiny infusion of adrenergic warmth every time she coughed from her car seat.

I did as I have done for her whole life and as I will for the remainder of our lives together.  The spectre of trauma always looming.

 

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On Awareness and Activism

Joy and painTomorrow is world TSC awareness day. My one ask is you wear something blue for Kaleigh and her friends. Wear blue. And read this. That’s it. (It’s a long read but bear with me…)
This is what Tuberous Sclerosis really means to me and my family.
TSC is exuberantly walking in to see more pictures of the baby growing inside you and walking out a changed person. It is waiting in the still shadows of the ultrasound room for the specialist to be called down as you stifle tears. It screaming at the silent and still baby in your belly as you rush yourself to the hospital, “MOVE BABY GIRL! STAY WITH ME! JUST MOVE!” It is the sweet triumphant sound of a screaming, pink baby. It is surrendering your sweet newborn to doctors and massive machines and tests. It is the inexplicable joy of taking the daughter you were told may not make it to birth home. It is the love surrounding her. It is a blue and white striped shirt with a blue headband on a smiling 4 month old going to a routine appointment only to find that she is in heart failure. It is PICU stays and discharges. It is tiny bodies besieged by seizures. It is hour upon hours of therapy to learn to hold up her head, roll, laugh, eat, crawl, talk. It is tears of determination. It is hard work. It is a breath holding, adrenaline rushing, sight narrowing, mind clearing experience in which there is no time to panic only time to act. It is silent prayers and ones screamed at the top of your lungs to a God you aren’t even sure exists because you can’t imagine an entity that would allow a child to suffer. It is tumors and medication schedules. It is saying Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma like a boss because the term is burned into your brain, because it is a scary, scary thing in the middle of your child’s brain that could kill her. It is learning to read an MRI without a medical degree. It is taking charge. It is learning that advocating for your child can make you look like a huge B and it is necessary. It is the soul crushing experience of resuscitating your child. It is hearing the long awaited “I love you” after hours of delusional screaming in excruciating kidney failure. It is the weight of a lifeless toddler in your arms. It is catching the stumbly child you waited 28 months to see up and walking on two feet. It is avoiding public bathrooms because the hand dryer is more potent than kryptonite. It is jumpy, spinny, stimmy, kinetic joy. It is tears of joy upon hearing a tiny uttered “uh-oh” after a two and a half hour seizure. It is ambulance rides. It is tiny whispered “Friends?” and her excited expectation of hearing me say “Forever.” It is a demand that I ask for kisses only to be met with a yell of “No KISSES!” a giggle, and a lean in to accept the forbidden kiss. It is learning to write after 9 years of determination. It is getting your child fitted in her brand spanking new bright green wheelchair because even though she can walk she still needs a damn wheelchair. It is defying all expectations. It is singing in the backseat on long car rides to specialists.
TSC is joy and pain. It is heartache and healing. It is patience and anxiety. It is fear and steadfastness. It is rock bottom and jubilation. It is tenacity and acquiescence. It is holding on and letting go. It is acceptance and rejection.
It is love. All abiding, never ending love.
TSC is my family. TSC is as entwined in our existence as it in Kaleigh’s 16th chromosome. #IamTSC #WorldTSCAwarenessDay

On Fighting for One’s Life

hospital

There are no words for watching your child fight for her life.  Instead, there are beeps and humming and the mechanical sounds of that which is not human but used to sustain the very human who is most precious to you in this world.

The human body is both terrifying and remarkable.  The fragility of life lay juxtaposed with its resilience. In both manner it is breathtaking.  It is a blessing and a curse to bear witness to the raw power.

It was Wednesday.  Winter pressed heavy on our household.  The spectre of illness swirled ’round.  News flashed with reports of norovirus, flu, and measles–all background noise.  Stacks of papers filled my office–IEPs for my children and other children who needed help, insurance forms, financial planning, medical documents, and the veritable detritus of parenting a child with a rare disease.  I was hunkered in for a day of paperwork.

It did not surprise me when I received a call from the nurse who reported my daughter was looking tired and complaining of a headache and stomache.  I picked her up from school and, as expected, she spiked a fever.  She was chatty and pleasant; she had an appetite; she even annoyed the heck out of me.  I prepared for the typical childhood virus with a little added flair due to her underlying medical conditions.  I certainly was not prepared for what was to come.

Three days later she was in the PICU fighting for her life.

There was nothing I could’ve done differently to prevent it. (That didn’t stop me from blaming myself)  Nothing can prepare one for the sudden silence.  It is deafening.  She was quiet and my mind was screaming loud.  What if I had brought her in to the ER earlier?  But, I had brought her to the pediatrician and he said she was ok.  What if I had held one medication?  But, that wouldn’t have mattered.  What if?  What if?  What if I could’ve done something different to protect her?  What if I caused her Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)?  Perhaps some inherent flaw in me, my character, my body, my soul caused her TSC, the tiny mutation on her 16th chromosome, which caused benign tumors to grow throughout her vital organs and wreaked havoc on her bodily systems.

Yes, yes it had to have been me.

In all the silence of her sickly slumber the deduction was that the fault and control lay with me; because, the truth was too terrifying.  The truth was like the erratic beeps and buzzers erupting from the machines crowded around to monitor the goings on inside my baby–that there was no predicting or control.  There was only vigilance.

Her body was and is remarkable and terrifying; and, I had and never will have any control over that.  I could and can only love her and be vigilant.

When her silence turned into screams I held the sacred space that is a mother’s love.  I couldn’t fulfill the motherly task of “making it all better” for her and I won’t ever be able, but I could and can hold the loving space for her resilience to bloom.  I stood firm and reminded her who she was as her body tried to steal that from her. I held the ghosts of every PICU and hospital stay past at bay for her (and me) to make space for whatever was to come.  I hummed softly in her ear the tune I have sung to her since I rocked her in the NICU as a preemie and she settled.  And her body began to heal.

We have been fortunate to celebrate her resilience and full recovery!  Yet the shadow of life’s fragility haunts.  The memory of the fight follows like a faint monitor beeping drumbeat; a ghostly shadow that lay just behind the veil of the exuberance of life; or deja vu that steals one’s breath midsentence.  Life is both wonderful and terrifying if only for one word–love.

There are no words for watching your child fight for her life.  There is only raw emotion; primal fear; all-consuming love; and breathtaking awe.

On Never Enough

The sounds of “The Greatest Showman” reverberated off the windows of the car and her tiny voice sang along. It was one of her new skills and, by far, my favorite–she is a beautiful singer to boot. I took solace in the melody and her voice as we continued on our way to Boston and her speciality appointments.

The juxtaposition of her blossoming development and the fact that we were traveling to urgently scheduled appointments for difficult issues related to her complex medical diagnosis did not elude me. Our life together is this constant dance of uncertainty and fear riding along side simplicity and gratitude.

One of her favorite songs began and she sweetly sang along “never enough, never enough…” My mind wandered and weaved forward to the appointments of the day and the Herculean task ahead and back to the heartbreaking texts I received in the morning from a fellow mother parenting a child affected by the same rare genetic disorder as my daughter. I tuned back in to her singing.

All the stars we steal from the night sky
Will never be enough, never be enough
Towers of gold are still too little
These hands could hold the world but it’ll
Never be enough, never be enough
For me, never, never”

As I listened, I landed firmly in that space between fear and gratitude. The space is the vacuous home of “never enough.” It is the stark reality of my life raising a child with a rare genetic disorder and extraordinary need. All the moments we stole that we were never meant to have, all the money it took, all the change we made in this world to make it a better, more accepting place for her will never be enough for my sweet child.

It will never be enough to delve deep into her genome and repair the small deletion that sentenced her to a lifetime of complex and immense struggle. A mother’s number one job is to fix all that ails one’s child and I cannot. I will never be enough. We are further stuck within a medical system that is woefully unequipped to handle her needs now and in the future.

Nevertheless, we drive on–this time to another appointment for a Hail Mary treatment. There will be many more. The future will surely hold more therapies, new medications, treatments, clinical trials, and we will weigh the pros and cons of all. We will never stop because she is more than enough.

The song shuffled and she began to belt out a new tune. I was jolted out of my free fall. She really is the sweetest, hardest working, most glorious miracle; she is more than enough. She is love and my love for her is indescribable. Perhaps that is enough.

Yes, perhaps love is enough. It is what I will fill the space between fear and gratitude. I will fill “never enough” with love.

On Persistence

AtlasHave you ever felt on the edge?  A razor’s width away from the world crushing you?  Have you ever thought maybe you should let it?  Have you ever wondered what would happened if you stopped holding it up, like enduring Atlas, and let the sky fall?

Of course you have, because you are like me–blessed and burdened by circumstance; you are a parent of the extraordinary.  The weight is unimaginable and the task so tiring; for who can hold up the world and the sky?

Nevertheless, we persist.

What is the alternative?  For the sky to come crashing down?

It does that anyway; it falls  with every crisis, every diagnosis, every meltdown, every school meeting, every stare, every medication failure.  And, that is why it is our job to hold it up.  It is our job to make sense of it all every time the earth shakes and another crisis rips the heavens from the firmament.  It is our job to piece it back together–azure patch dotted by fluffy white, patent-leather black pin studded with shiny bright diamonds.

We must make sense of it for our blessed and burdened, extraordinary pieces of heart walking around outside our chests.  For, if we didn’t there would be no understanding, no up or down, no hope.  We would be crushed by nature.

Who makes sense of it for us–holding the earth and the sky, picking up the pieces, placing the stars back one by one?  Who makes sense of the nonsensical?  Who helps carry crushing burden when we fear it will flatten us?  When we are weary and we wish it to?

I do.  We do.  We shoulder our burdens together because we are the few who can understand the job–the immense burden and blessing.  We link arms and hunch shoulders to disperse the weight as we speak of the crises, and diagnoses, the meltdowns, and meetings, the stares, and medications.  We stoop low and scoop the scattered stars and shattered blue canvas of sky the next time it comes tumbling down and help to paste it back up again–and again, and again.

Nevertheless, we persist.

 

On Grieving the Living

Girl Running in Woods
In October I Remember She is the Girl Who Lived

I gazed up at the blue skies mottled by billowing white; bright reds and golds jutted upward cutting through the azure plain.  My soul was weary.  There was a distinct chill in the air and a cold breeze blew that rustled the leaves casting them down to their final resting place.  My thoughts danced around the archetypal shadow of loss and death.  

The weather fit nicely like a warm, woolen, worn boot; it was like the Octobers of my childhood.  I took solace in the familiarity.  It was not like the Octobers of late with their warm breezes and their confusing temperatures—the harbingers of climate change.  I watched the wind whip a pile of dried leaves into a small cyclone.  It mimicked my thoughts and the churning within.

We received the diagnosis of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) for our sweet baby girl in October.  Every year when the leaves die so does another piece of my heart.  Like every October, it is a bit different and there is great beauty, loss and grief. 

Til the day I die, I will carry the extraordinary burden of grief that was bestowed upon me in October.

***

I always wanted a girl.  I was ecstatic when I found out I was carrying a girl.  I never dreamed of doing her hair or of princess dresses, but rather of bestowing upon her the secrets and great gifts that have been accumulated over generations of womanhood. It was my greatest desire to share with her the power of being female.  Like every mother, I rubbed my belly and infused the baby growing in my womb with my hopes and dreams.  Some basic—to be provided for; health; and survival—and some more grandiose—to be a force with which to be reckoned; to know her power and own it; to love and appreciate art, music, literature, and culture; to be kind, ambitious, fair, loving, philanthropic, an activist, and, yes, a feminist.

All these hopes and dreams came crashing down like a poorly constructed house of cards when met with the diagnosis of TSC and the hope was replaced with a single hope: let her live. 

Survival. 

Please, to all the powers that be, let my baby live.

And, so began my journey into grief.

I skipped right over denial and anger—there was no denying the images of her tiny body floating in my womb and her heart riddled with tumors.  I was too shocked to be be angry.  I moved right on to bargaining.  

Please, I will do anything; I will give anything; I will be anything; just let my baby live.

And, she did.

She came screaming into this world a couple months later, pink and lovely as could be, and still there was no denying that she had TSC.  Yet, the only thing predictable about TSC is the unpredictability.  Our sweet girl could be very mildly affected—lead a completely normal life with monitoring and the help of medication.  My hopes and dreams blew back in like a gust of autumnal wind and filled my soul.  

There was a bottomless pit of grief, that I could not identify and yet felt so intimately, and I was at the bottom.  But now, there was a ladder of hope on which I began to climb out of that pit.  Nevertheless, grief never leaves.  It marks you like a scar on your soul.  While there was hope, my grief merely shifted.

Please, I will do anything; I will give anything; I will be anything; just let my baby remain seizure free, let her avoid heart complications, let her avoid a life-threatening tumor in the middle of her brain, let her avoid autism, let her live.

My pleadings became ever more complex like chantings to the gods.  Under all the bargaining was intense and immeasurable sadness—nameless grief.  I did not comprehend that I could be grieving because I had this beautiful, tiny, amazing human in my arms who smelled ever so sweet and made tiny squeaks and coos.  There is no grief when your child lives.

Then came heart failure—heart functioning “incompatible with life.”  She was four months old.  Let her live became an ever present chant in my head.  I heard it constantly.  Soon to follow were seizures then catastrophic epilepsy in the form of infantile spasms then confirmation of a SEGA.  

Let her live.  Let her live.  Let her live.  

I was too busy caring for her to feel—to notice the grief I was dragging along with me like a monstrous ball and chain.  Until the quiet hours of the night when the mantra would cease and the only sound would be her tiny sleep sounds and the enormity of it all would settle on my chest like the weight of the world.  

This can’t be real.  This can’t be her life.  This cant be our life:  Denial.

Why?  I hate this!  I can’t do this anymore!!  I did everything right.  I listened to the doctors.  I took all the vitamins.  I hate the world.  F*ck this. F*ck TSC:  Anger.

Please, just let her live.  Please, please, please: Bargaining.

She grew and we welcomed her brother and another October came and went and an immense sadness haunted me like a ghost.  The specter of the loss of the life I thought she would have, the mother I thought I would be, the family I thought we would be, the life I thought we would lead haunted me.  Fear crept in: Depression.

And, she lived.  She has lived.  She continues to live and thrive with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex:  Acceptance.

It was not until I settled into the sadness and the loss that I was able to identify the reality of my grief—the both-ness of it.  The death of a dream and the birth of what is and who she is exist hand in hand.  There is a deep and ever evolving grief in that.  My dreams have shifted as has my grief.  

October to October I have seen many of the dreams I had for my girl fade from verdant hopeful green to blazing bargaining red then wither and fall to earth in grief filled loss; and, I have learned that they will be replaced with new dreams that bud and bloom in the full glory and newness of green hope.  My grief is part of me—as natural and integral as the tree’s life cycle.

As the Octobers pass my mantra has changed.  Now it is: 

I fear her loss because of my love.  Let my love surround her.  Let our love sustain.