On Awareness and Activism

Joy and painTomorrow is world TSC awareness day. My one ask is you wear something blue for Kaleigh and her friends. Wear blue. And read this. That’s it. (It’s a long read but bear with me…)
This is what Tuberous Sclerosis really means to me and my family.
TSC is exuberantly walking in to see more pictures of the baby growing inside you and walking out a changed person. It is waiting in the still shadows of the ultrasound room for the specialist to be called down as you stifle tears. It screaming at the silent and still baby in your belly as you rush yourself to the hospital, “MOVE BABY GIRL! STAY WITH ME! JUST MOVE!” It is the sweet triumphant sound of a screaming, pink baby. It is surrendering your sweet newborn to doctors and massive machines and tests. It is the inexplicable joy of taking the daughter you were told may not make it to birth home. It is the love surrounding her. It is a blue and white striped shirt with a blue headband on a smiling 4 month old going to a routine appointment only to find that she is in heart failure. It is PICU stays and discharges. It is tiny bodies besieged by seizures. It is hour upon hours of therapy to learn to hold up her head, roll, laugh, eat, crawl, talk. It is tears of determination. It is hard work. It is a breath holding, adrenaline rushing, sight narrowing, mind clearing experience in which there is no time to panic only time to act. It is silent prayers and ones screamed at the top of your lungs to a God you aren’t even sure exists because you can’t imagine an entity that would allow a child to suffer. It is tumors and medication schedules. It is saying Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma like a boss because the term is burned into your brain, because it is a scary, scary thing in the middle of your child’s brain that could kill her. It is learning to read an MRI without a medical degree. It is taking charge. It is learning that advocating for your child can make you look like a huge B and it is necessary. It is the soul crushing experience of resuscitating your child. It is hearing the long awaited “I love you” after hours of delusional screaming in excruciating kidney failure. It is the weight of a lifeless toddler in your arms. It is catching the stumbly child you waited 28 months to see up and walking on two feet. It is avoiding public bathrooms because the hand dryer is more potent than kryptonite. It is jumpy, spinny, stimmy, kinetic joy. It is tears of joy upon hearing a tiny uttered “uh-oh” after a two and a half hour seizure. It is ambulance rides. It is tiny whispered “Friends?” and her excited expectation of hearing me say “Forever.” It is a demand that I ask for kisses only to be met with a yell of “No KISSES!” a giggle, and a lean in to accept the forbidden kiss. It is learning to write after 9 years of determination. It is getting your child fitted in her brand spanking new bright green wheelchair because even though she can walk she still needs a damn wheelchair. It is defying all expectations. It is singing in the backseat on long car rides to specialists.
TSC is joy and pain. It is heartache and healing. It is patience and anxiety. It is fear and steadfastness. It is rock bottom and jubilation. It is tenacity and acquiescence. It is holding on and letting go. It is acceptance and rejection.
It is love. All abiding, never ending love.
TSC is my family. TSC is as entwined in our existence as it in Kaleigh’s 16th chromosome. #IamTSC #WorldTSCAwarenessDay
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